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Bleeding time and clotting time post-extraction Rattus norvegicus tooth treated with ethanol extract gel from Terminalia cattapa L. leaves

Abstract

Link of Video Abstract: https://youtu.be/iJSDiYl-BmA

 

Introduction: Post-extraction bleeding is a complication that is often encountered in dental practice. A decrease in the number of platelets will increase the risk of bleeding. If left untreated, complications can range from hematoma to severe blood loss. The use of medicinal plants is common in traditional medicine throughout the world. Flavonoids and tannins are the main compounds that play a role in the blood clotting process. The ethanol extract of Terminalia catappa L. leaves contains: saponins, alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, triterpenoids, and phenols. This research aims to determine bleeding time and clotting time after tooth extraction. White mice were given ethanol extract gel from Terminalia cattapa L. leaves.

Method: Study design using randomized with post-test only control group design, in vivo. A population of 35 male white rats (Rattus norvegicus) of the Wistar strain, were grouped randomly into 7 groups. The extraction of white rat teeth using artery clamps, measurement of bleeding time and clotting time using three stopwatches, and the results were averaged.

Result: The results of the research showed that the ethanol extract gel of Terminalia cattapa L. leaves had a shorter bleeding time and clotting time than pure gel, after tooth extraction from white rats.

Conclusion: Terminalia catappa L. leaf ethanol extract gels have the ability to shorten bleeding time and clotting time and the best gel concentration is 50%.

References

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How to Cite

Sirat, N. M., Senjaya, A. A. ., Rusminingsih, N. K. ., & Sali, I. W. . (2023). Bleeding time and clotting time post-extraction Rattus norvegicus tooth treated with ethanol extract gel from Terminalia cattapa L. leaves . Bali Medical Journal, 13(1), 278–281. https://doi.org/10.15562/bmj.v13i1.4923

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